9 Design Podcasts to Listen to While Doing the Dishes

9 Design Podcasts to Listen to While Doing the Dishes

When students or teammates ask me where or how to go about learning a given thing, I typically start with a recommendation to join the local library and download their app (props to whoever made the Libby app), and a handful of podcasts to listen to.
I then encourage people to get in the habit of doing something healthy while listening to something interesting and fill-the-cupish. I’ve learned about dark patterns while mowing the lawn, and the double diamond while doing the dishes. When my hands are on autopilot my mind can soak things in (or dream things up). Chores + listening has maybe become my favorite past time.

In order to aid adoption and save people time, I recently started spreadsheeting and cataloging all of the design-related podcasts episodes, books/audiobooks, articles, etc that have been useful, entertaining, or memorable in order to share with my peoples. Common vocabulary goes a long way.

While that assembly is still underway, here are the 9 standout design podcast episodes I have suggested that my coworkers listen to first. 

#1 Design Ethics and the Race to the Bottom of the Brain Stem via Presentable

It feels right to start out with a discussion on ethics and persuasion given today’s landscape. The guest on this episode is Tristan Harris, former design ethicist at Google and what The Atlantic has referred to as, “the closest thing Silicon Valley has to a conscience.”
Presentable is hosted by Jeff Veen, one of the founders of Adaptive Path and later a principal at places like Adobe and Google. The podcast has high-profile guests is overall high quality.

#2 Infused Design with Jared Spool via UX Podcast

I included this one mainly because if you’re not familiar with Jared Spool, you should be. I could’ve honestly picked any of Spool’s podcast appearances, but I liked the broad message of this one regarding the topic of our roles as designers within organizations.
UX podcast is based out of Sweden and run by co-hosts James Royal-Lawson and Per Axbom. They mostly feature interviews with speakers – well known and less well-known – from some of the big conferences in Europe like UXLx, Business to Buttons, etc.

#3 Colour Schemes: How Colours Make You Buy via Under the Influence

Again, I could’ve picked any of a hundred episodes from Under the Influence but I thought this was a nice one for a design-related list. This episode has some interesting anecdotes on branding and color choice, some pop-psych and studies related to color and it’s overall a fun listen.
Under the Influence is run by Terry O’Reilly, a copywriter, and former ad person. The podcast is advertising focused, interesting, well researched, and I’ve yet to hit an episode I didn’t find interesting.

#4 Be a Good Ancestor with Alan Cooper via User Defenders

This is another choice based on the interviewee. Alan Cooper is just fun to listen to, and not just because he says ‘Fuck’ a lot. If you haven’t read his books, articles or heard him speak, this is a pretty good place to start.
I should note that I don’t spend much time with the User Defenders podcast. There are some aspects I don’t care for quite as much as other shows, but I don’t want to sway opinion too much. There might be some gold in there I haven’t struck yet.

#5 How Big is My Penis (and other things we ask google) via Freakonomics

Yes, I picked this one for the salacious title. Choosing a Freakonomics episode is impossible. BUT, I genuinely enjoyed and found useful the guest’s book, so this episode is a nice cliffs notes version. The guest is Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, author of Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are, and his book covers clever ways to gain insights into one of my favorite subjects: the discrepancies between what we say and what we do.
Seriously, if you don’t listen to Freakonomics start at books then work your way through all of the podcasts from the beginning. If that’s not you, other good places to start are the series on Creativity and the Life of a CEO series.

#6 Negative Space: Logo Design with Michael Beirut via 99% Invisible

I was torn between this one and Making a Mark: Visual Identity with Tom Geismar. You should listen to both. Both designers are legend. I ended up choosing this episode only because it has some slightly more contemporary examples and discussion.
Listen to 99% Invisible. It’s good. I’m pretty sure it’s the most well known design-related podcast. The episodes are 99% interesting. Very few duds.

#7 How to Give Good Feedback via Presentable

This episode features an interview with former Twitter VP/Design and current VP at Invision Mike Davidson. Our whole team should go back and listen to this episode because we DEFINITELY have feedback on Invision and want to make sure it is as actionable as possible. But the episode is good and while there are loads of great podcasts on running reviews and meetings, I thought this one started at a good level.

#8 The Power of Saying No via Design Review

I have seen a number of designers – including myself – struggle with some of the topics in this episode and I think it’s a worthwhile listen, especially for jr. designers.
The Design Review podcast, though less polished and not my all-time fav, has had some nice episodes. Fairly hands-on and tactical topics for the junior – mid-level designers. They’ve got some nice episodes on career, culture, and workplace.

#9 Building a team with Alissa Briggs via UX Podcast

I came across this episode right at a time when we were scaling the design team here at Shockoe and were going through some of the issues and activities Alissa discusses in the show. It meant a lot to me to hear that other folks were having similar issues and discovering similar approaches. Really enjoyed the episode and definitely useful for any of us in the position of scaling small teams.

Speaking of Podcasts, check out our in-house one!

Jaime Young

Jaime Young

Jamie is the experience design lead at Shockoe with ten years of experience in media,
advertising, and technology under his belt. When he’s not helping Shockoe’s clients to create
better mobile apps, Jamie chases chickens and tends gardens with his wife on their property. He also enjoys moonlighting as a teacher at the VCU Brandcenter when he has time.

5 Mobile Experience Design Trends to Invest In

5 Mobile Experience Design Trends to Invest In

With new technology being rolled out regularly, designers have a fantastic opportunity to use new tools and methods to improve the products we create for mobile experiences. This is our time to marry content, personalization, voice interactions, micro-interactions, and video to produce unique experiences that will attract and impress users for years to come.

 

1. Being Content-Centered

Our clients often look to us for the most effective means of distributing their content in a way that services the users and provides the client with reliable and quality data.

“Time is of the essence” has never been a truer statement. Users have super-short attention spans (Hubspot reports only about 8 seconds or so) that shrink more every year. Seconds matter – so while design can be pretty, more importantly, it needs to be purposeful. If we aren’t designing to make the content the most important aspect of each screen, then we are failing our clients and most importantly, users.

While designing around content that has yet to be provided is far from ideal, there are a few workarounds. You can always default to the popular Lorem Ipsum placeholder text, or you could try using the content that’s being replaced from your client’s current site, create your own, or borrow from a competitor’s site.

By using text and color as interactive design elements, you can strategically create quick, vibrant, and delightful user experiences that expedite the user’s journey with a content-centered experience. Keep it simple. You don’t want to overwhelm your users with too much information.

This insurance app does a great job of displaying multiple options in a visually simple way, both in a tab and main menu format.

 

content-centered-insurance-app

Image Credit: Nimasha Perara

 

2. Personalization

Personalization is one of the most frequently requested features in user interviews. Weather content, design, or navigation, users like to feel connected with the user interface. If there’s a pattern of disconnect, they will likely not want to return, especially given a user’s ever-shrinking attention span.

Personalization can be achieved in a number of ways, including:

  • Enabling cookies on websites to remember what users prefer on your site
  • Implementing location tools on mobile to remind users of their interests
  • Incorporating the seasons or holidays to create a user experience that feels current and relative, and allowing users to create profiles to customize their experience.

More often than not, people are more inclined to share negative experiences than positive ones, so it is imperative that we are creating a more intuitive experience for our users. If users feel a connection with a website or app, they will want to return and hopefully share their positive experiences.

The animation below highlights one of Shockoe’s latest customizable interfaces for a banking application. We helped create a mobile experience that allowed members to customize which cards they land on first, allowing users to get their most important information faster.

 

shockoe-banking-app-personalization

 

3. Voice Interaction

There is no denying the impact that Siri, Alexa, and Google have made on our usability. My seven-year-old daughter chats up Alexa regularly — asking for songs, to make animal noises, and even a few weeks back, asked if she was married! I find this to be a testament to what next-generation interaction looks like and the importance of adopting it sooner rather than later.

Over 30 million households now have voice interaction tools, which is incredible! The rise of voice interaction will undoubtedly drive the increase of designing without an interface. Good UX seeks the path of least resistance, and voice interaction certainly bypasses any friction that may have existed in a physical UI.

When designing for voice interactions, experienced designers will need to to take into account many new considerations. Providing users with suggestions may help alleviate confusion when the system doesn’t understand the command or cannot produce the desired result. For example, you could have a retail app say: “You can ask to order shoes or browse shoes.” You should also consider providing the user with an easy way out by offering “leave” as an option.

Is the mic even on? Users will need to know when the AI they’re chatting with is paying attention and when there might be a problem.

 

voice-interaction

Image Credit: Juan C. Angustia

 

4. Microinteractions

Engaging with micro-interactions is one of my favorite things when using an app. Micro-interactions are simply subtle design effects based around completing a task. These tiny interactions bring a level of delight to a user experience. If implemented correctly, these in-app gestures and animations can reduce design clutter, increase intuitiveness, and make interaction almost seamless. Fewer buttons on a screen mean more focused content, and we all know that having the right content, is king.

Medium has a controversial “clapping” interaction, as an alternative way to “like” an article you’ve read. Love them or hate them, these tiny claps with fireworks are both silly and cute enough to have caused a plethora of blog posts both praising and cursing the change from “likes” to “claps”. Humans inherently hate change, so it’s not surprising that bloggers took to the Internet to vent about this change, just as they did with Instagram’s iconic logo change a few years back. Change is sometimes a necessary evil — it’s where great ideas stem from. I for one applaud medium for taking the bold step to attempt to improve usability.

With micro-interactions, there is an opportunity to bridge the gap between the user and the app through fun and satisfying actions that leave users emotionally content – they help engage users to interact with tasks intuitively, like express appreciation with likes or favorites, navigate sites with subtle animated transitions, or filling out form fields with hint text.

Predictive micro-interactions can provide directive animations to assist users with onboarding, making it more delightful and ultimately, less confusing

 

microinteractions

Image Credit: Leo Zakour

 

5. Fullscreen & Vertical Video

In 2017, the use of videos surged as a marketing medium. Hubspot reports that 81% of businesses utilized videos as a marketing tool and nearly 100% of those businesses say they’ll continue to do so in 2018. 65% of the businesses that didn’t use videos in 2017 say they are planning to in 2018.

Words are important, but with videos, users are able to experience a more interactive form of content while also consuming more information in a shorter amount of time. This is another form of putting content front and center in a way that doesn’t force users to scroll. With AR and VR becoming more common, a full-screen video will inevitably become the norm, providing users with a more immersive: personally-impactful experience that will give them more of an emotional connection. When users are immersed in another person’s experience, be it skiing the slopes, walking in an impassioned protest, exploring caves, or learning a new DIY project, they are bound to have a richer and deeper connection with the content.

As video content infiltrates our favorite sites and apps, users tend to keep their mobile devices in portrait mode, rather than turning them horizontally for a full-width view. According to LukeW, 94% of users view their content in portrait mode, while only 6% view content in landscape mode, thus the obvious need to provide users with the option to view all content, including video, in portrait mode.

Apple’s new Clip app offers users fullscreen AR selfies similar to Snapchat’s World Lenses. Mashable reports that Clip will offer an animated 360° scene that you can experience by moving the camera around.

 

fullscreen-vertical-app-video

Image Credit: Apple

 

facebook-live-video-app

Facebook Live Video. Image Credit Buzzfeed

 

Other Experience Trend Shoutouts

Since I couldn’t list every single popular experience trend, I wanted to at least show some love to a couple more experiences worth mentioning.

AR and VR

Quickly evolving into affordable and viable options for both enterprises and consumers. Whether you’re looking for augmented/virtual entertainment or augmented/virtual training, this medium has yet to surface its full potential. As AR and VR continue to find great ubiquity and user acceptance, think about how this technology could advance the medical, construction, aeronautics, and engineering fields in the years ahead.

Biometrics

It may seem new, and it sort of is, but since Apple released the iPhone X’s biometric face identification feature, it appears the bar has risen in security authentication. Fingerprint authorization is now common in comparison. Biometrics will continue to innovate and demand designers and developers to push the envelope when considering the user’s privacy and security concerns. Designers will need to keep in mind the willingness of their users to participate in the functionality and devs will need to remember that biometrics don’t protect against passcodes or tokens being shared. They’re simply new ways for users to gain access to their data without being too inconvenienced with passcode interruptions.

Jason Day
Jason Day

Jason graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design and holds degrees in Illustration and Sequential Art. His diverse professional careers have ranged from comic book artist, picture framer, retail store management, photographer, building inspector, and designer, demonstrating his ability to understand multiple facets of thinking and implementing them in intuitive ways.

Design Tips to Increase Satisfaction in Banking Apps – Part 2 of 2

Design Tips to Increase Satisfaction in Banking Apps – Part 2 of 2

In the first part of these series, we covered examples of best practices that we have seen play a role in facilitating engagement and improving the user experience.

For the second section of this two-part series, we will cover examples of best practices that we have seen play a role in facilitating engagement and improving the user experience.

Got question surfacing as you read? Give us a ring!

Search & Navigation Part 1

Content Part 1

Guidance Part 2

Privacy & Security Part 2

Appearance Part 2

 

Part 2: Guidance

Similar to what we mentioned for Search & Navigation— ease of use is the most important factor in overall app satisfaction. If users need to complete tasks, make sure you help guide them through the process from start to finish. Here are some tips:

 

Related functions not grouped together.

If you have multiple ways to complete the same task, organize the navigation in a way that makes it easy to find all the similar tasks in one place. For example, some financial applications separate sending money via a mobile number from other payment/transfer operations.

guidance search and nav bank apps

Unnecessary steps to make the user get to where they want to go.

Don’t make the user dig for the information they need. Several banks hide useful details behind another tap, and some even request the user to fill out a form before showing them the details they are looking for. For example, some banks don’t provide easy access to view savings accounts and/ or interest rates.

my credit card - showing info

Progress trackers help users understand how many steps it takes to complete a task, what the next step is, and how far along they are in the process.

Providing a stepper is an easy UX improvement in terms of giving a user more guidance in completing their tasks. You’d be surprised how often you see a multi-step process in bank applications that don’t incorporate this simple yet effective guidance method.

progress trackers in banking app

Provide guidance when you are not letting the user proceed to the next step, let the user know why and how to resolve the necessary actions.

If a user is not allowed to transfer more money than their account balance tell them why.

provide guidance for next step in banking app

User real-time validations on field entries

Don’t play “gotcha!” Whenever possible, let a user know right away if they’ve made a mistake or need to correct something.

User real-time validations on field entries baking app

Either indicate which fields are required, OR only indicate which fields are optional.

indicate which fields are required in banking app

indicate which fields are required in banking app banking app 2

Make it easy to contact the support center

When a user can’t complete a task they are trying to perform they are frustrated, and making them look for help will make them even more frustrated. Make it easily accessible at all times.

support center contact banking app

Part 2: Privacy & Security

Generally, only 31% of bank members use their bank’s mobile app. Of this 31%  there are advocates for the app and prefer using the app over visiting a branch, or using the website. If people are enjoying the app so much why is adoption only 31%? The primary hurdle banks need to overcome is trust. This isn’t a surprise to anyone. We are all aware of this hurdle and have seen great efforts in increasing trust. However, there is always room for more improvement.

Biometric login

Some banks have been making the switch to utilize device biometrics like fingerprint, voice, face recognition. These security measures are not only comforting for consumers but easy to use and adoption is high.

Biometric login in banking app

Provide privacy policies in context

When asking for personal information in an effort to make the app more beneficial to the user, explain why you need it and only when you need it.

privacy policies in context in banking app

Bank first, instead of the customer first

Some apps will not provide the interests rate for a product until after the user applies and provides personal contact information. This is a breach of privacy for the benefit of the sale/marketing and not helpful to the consumer. All the user wants to know is the interest rate so don’t hide it from them.

customer first mobile banking app showing loan amount

Part 2: Appearance

components of app satisfaction chart

Appearance is the second most important component that impacts user’s app satisfaction, coming in at just 1% lower than the most important— Ease of Navigating. An aesthetically beautiful app will elicit a positive emotional response to the experience. At Shockoe, we understand how important this is, which is why we value UI just as much as we do UX. Here are a few tips we’ve used to help clean up bank app interfaces:

Poor content hierarchy

Content organization is a role for both the UX of an application and the UI. Determining the type of content display, and the order in which it’s displayed is pivotal in UX design, while UI design will bring that experience to life using visual hierarchy. Visual hierarchy is based on the Gestalt theory which examines the perception of elements in relation to each other and shows how people tend to unify elements into groups using size, contrast, proximity, negative space, and other design techniques.

content hierarchy in a banking app

Crammed screens

Order makes everything more comprehensible. The same works with user interfaces of digital products. Make sure the focus of the UI is clear and minimized. Don’t cram lots of unnecessary text that doesn’t help the consumer accomplish their task. Don’t bombard them with too many actions to choose from.

comprehensible screens for banking app

Illegible text

Accessibility is mandatory. Make sure all content is legible and follow contrast & size guidelines.

illegible text banking app

 

Make sure actionable items look interactive.

For mobile devices, Google Android and iOS have guidelines on how large a touch-area should be so that any finger large or small can tap an interactive element with ease. Make sure these guidelines are being met.

Make sure actionable items look interactive banking app

large a touch-area should be so that any finger large or small can tap an interactive element with ease on banking app

 

Make sure the interfaces have visual cues as to which elements are actionable or not. Keep in mind that depending on the type of action; hold, swipe, tap, etc— that the correct commonly understood visual cues are being used.

What did you think about these design tips? We’d love to hear your feedback!

Ready to increase user satisfaction in your app? Connect with us here.

 

 

Samantha Carbonell

Samantha Carbonell

UI/UX Designer

In addition to traveling all over the world — China, Thailand, Korea, Germany, Amsterdam, and El Salvador — Samantha has experience working overseas in Japan. While living in Okinawa, Japan, she freelanced as a graphic designer for a transportation company, tasked with finding a creative solution for encouraging a younger audience to use the bus system. A graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, Sam holds a degree in Graphic Design. Inspired by modern, simplistic design, she adds an aesthetic and conceptual quality to all branding material she creates.

5 Mobile Experience Design Trends to Try Now

5 Mobile Experience Design Trends to Try Now

With new technology being rolled out regularly, we designers have a fantastic opportunity to use new tools and methods to improve the products we create for mobile experiences. This is our time to marry content, personalization, voice interactions, microinteractions, and video to produce unique experiences that will attract and impress users for years to come.

With 2018 well underway, I’d like to review five important experience trends that are bound to make a deep impact this year and will likely continue to define the way in which apps are developed in the years ahead.

 

1. Being Content-Centered

 

Our clients often look to us for the most effective means of distributing their content in a way that services the users and provides the client with reliable and quality data.

“Time is of the essence” has never been a truer statement. Users have super-short attention spans (Hubspot reports only about 8 seconds or so) that shrink more every year. Seconds matter – so while design can be pretty, more importantly, it needs to be purposeful. If we aren’t designing to make the content the most important aspect of each screen, then we are failing our clients and most importantly, users.

While designing around content that has yet to be provided is far from ideal, there are a few workarounds. You can always default to the popular Lorem Ipsum placeholder text, or you could try using the content that’s being replaced from your client’s current site, create your own, or borrow from a competitor’s site.

By using text and color as interactive design elements, you can strategically create quick, vibrant, and delightful user experiences that expedite the user’s journey with a content-centered experience. Keep it simple. You don’t want to overwhelm your users with too much information.

This insurance app does a great job of displaying multiple options in a visually simple way, both in a tab and main menu format.

 

content-centered-insurance-app

Image Credit: Nimasha Perara

2. Personalization

 

Personalization is one of the most frequently requested features in user interviews. Weather content, design, or navigation, users like to feel connected with the user interface. If there’s a pattern of disconnect, they will likely not want to return, especially given a user’s ever-shrinking attention span.

Personalization can be achieved in a number of ways, including:

  • Enabling cookies on websites to remember what users prefer on your site
  • Implementing location tools on mobile to remind users of their interests
  • Incorporating the seasons or holidays to create a user experience that feels current and relative, and allowing users to create profiles to customize their experience.

More often than not, people are more inclined to share negative experiences than positive ones, so it is imperative that we are creating a more intuitive experience for our users. If users feel a connection with a website or app, they will want to return and hopefully share their positive experiences.

The animation below highlights one of Shockoe’s latest customizable interfaces for a banking application. We helped create a mobile experience that allowed members to customize which cards they land on first, allowing users to get their most important information faster.

 

shockoe-banking-app-personalization

3. Voice Interaction

 

There is no denying the impact that Siri, Alexa, and Google have made on our usability. My seven-year-old daughter chats up Alexa regularly — asking for songs, to make animal noises, and even a few weeks back, asked if she was married! I find this to be a testament to what next-generation interaction looks like and the importance of adopting it sooner rather than later.

Over 30 million households now have voice interaction tools, which is incredible! The rise of voice interaction will undoubtedly drive the increase of designing without an interface. Good UX seeks the path of least resistance, and voice interaction certainly bypasses any friction that may have existed in a physical UI.

[bctt tweet=”Over 30 million households now have voice interaction tools,” username=”shockoe”]

When designing for voice interactions, experienced designers will need to to take into account many new considerations. Providing users with suggestions may help alleviate confusion when the system doesn’t understand the command or cannot produce the desired result. For example, you could have a retail app say: “You can ask to order shoes or browse shoes.” You should also consider providing the user with an easy way out by offering “leave” as an option.

Is the mic even on? Users will need to know when the AI they’re chatting with is paying attention and when there might be a problem.

 

voice-interaction

Image Credit: Juan C. Angustia

4. Microinteractions

 

Engaging with microinteractions is one of my favorite things when using an app. Microinteractions are simply subtle design effects based around completing a task. These tiny interactions bring a level of delight to a user experience. If implemented correctly, these in-app gestures and animations can reduce design clutter, increase intuitiveness, and make interaction almost seamless. Fewer buttons on a screen mean more focused content, and we all know that having the right content, is king.

Medium has a controversial “clapping” interaction, as an alternative way to “like” an article you’ve read. Love them or hate them, these tiny claps with fireworks are both silly and cute enough to have caused a plethora of blog posts both praising and cursing the change from “likes” to “claps”. Humans inherently hate change, so it’s not surprising that bloggers took to the Internet to vent about this change, just as they did with Instagram’s iconic logo change a few years back. Change is sometimes a necessary evil — it’s where great ideas stem from. I for one applaud medium for taking the bold step to attempt to improve usability.

With microinteractions, there is an opportunity to bridge the gap between the user and the app through fun and satisfying actions that leave users emotionally content – they help engage users to interact with tasks intuitively, like express appreciation with likes or favorites, navigate sites with subtle animated transitions, or filling out form fields with hint text.

Predictive microinteractions can provide directive animations to assist users with onboarding, making it more delightful and ultimately, less confusing

 

microinteractions

Image Credit: Leo Zakour

5. Fullscreen & Vertical Video

 

In 2017, the use of videos surged as a marketing medium. Hubspot reports that 81% of businesses utilized videos as a marketing tool and nearly 100% of those businesses say they’ll continue to do so in 2018. 65% of the businesses that didn’t use videos in 2017 say they are planning to in 2018.

Words are important, but with videos, users are able to experience a more interactive form of content while also consuming more information in a shorter amount of time. This is another form of putting content front and center in a way that doesn’t force users to scroll. With AR and VR becoming more common, a full-screen video will inevitably become the norm, providing users with a more immersive: personally-impactful experience that will give them more of an emotional connection. When users are immersed in another person’s experience, be it skiing the slopes, walking in an impassioned protest, exploring caves, or learning a new DIY project, they are bound to have a richer and deeper connection with the content.

As video content infiltrates our favorite sites and apps, users tend to keep their mobile devices in portrait mode, rather than turning them horizontally for a full-width view. According to LukeW, 94% of users view their content in portrait mode, while only 6% view content in landscape mode, thus the obvious need to provide users with the option to view all content, including video, in portrait mode.

Apple’s new Clip app offers users fullscreen AR selfies similar to Snapchat’s World Lenses. Mashable reports that Clip will offer an animated 360° scene that you can experience by moving the camera around.

 

fullscreen-vertical-app-video

Image Credit: Apple

 

facebook-live-video-app

Facebook Live Video. Image Credit Buzzfeed

Other Experience Trend Shoutouts

 

Since I couldn’t list every single popular experience trend to look for in 2018 and beyond, I wanted to at least show some love to a couple more experiences worth mentioning.

AR and VR

Quickly evolving into affordable and viable options for both enterprises and consumers. Whether you’re looking for augmented/virtual entertainment or augmented/virtual training, this medium has yet to surface its full potential. As AR and VR continue to find great ubiquity and user acceptance, think about how this technology could advance the medical, construction, aeronautics, and engineering fields in the years ahead.

Biometrics

It may seem new, and it sort of is, but since Apple released the iPhone X’s biometric face identification feature, it appears the bar has risen in security authentication. Fingerprint authorization is now common in comparison. Biometrics will continue to innovate and demand designers and developers to push the envelope when considering the user’s privacy and security concerns. Designers will need to keep in mind the willingness of their users to participate in the functionality and devs will need to remember that biometrics don’t protect against passcodes or tokens being shared. They’re simply new ways for users to gain access to their data without being too inconvenienced with passcode interruptions.

Design Tips to Increase Satisfaction in Banking Apps – Part 1 of 2

Design Tips to Increase Satisfaction in Banking Apps – Part 1 of 2

Retail banking consumers now prefer using their mobile devices more than any other bank interaction, which makes a mobile app a primary component of overall customer satisfaction. With greater ease switching banking providers at a moment of dissatisfaction, banks need to place extra emphasis on keeping their customers happy and loyal. This starts by giving customers the best tools available and a user experience that helps them access and navigate their banking needs without difficulty. Read more about our design tips for banking apps below. 

 

For the first section of this two-part series, we will cover examples of best practices that we have seen play a role in facilitating engagement and improving the user experience.

Any questions surfacing as you read? Give us a ring! You can always connect with us here.

 

Search & Navigation Part 1

Content Part 1

Guidance Part 2, coming soon

Privacy & Security Part 2, coming soon

Appearance Part 2, coming soon

 

 

Search & Navigation

search-navigation-components-of-app-satisfaction

According to J.D. Power, ‘Ease of Navigating’ is the key differentiator among top-performing mobile banking apps. If a consumer can find what they need in the app, this often yields a happy customer. This satisfaction can also impact bank operations by reducing calls to support centers with potentially aggravating wait times.

 

Let’s jump head first into some easily-executed ideas to help improve your app’s search & navigation as early as today.

 

Easy Login

 

Biometric logins such as fingerprint, face, or voice can facilitate a client’s access to their account.

easy-login-biometric-one-touch

Personalization Capabilities

 

Some banks give the user the ability to customize their application experience to their needs making each visit one that addresses their specific needs.

personalization-personalize

Using Navigation Icons with Label

 

An icon is meant to be universally recognized, but in many cases, they are not. It’s always a safe bet to provide a label next to the icon to provide clarity.

 

using-navigation-icons-with-labels

Use Plain & Simple English

 

Avoid using branded names that might be intuitive to your company, but not to a user. In short: use plain English when possible.

 

use-plain-simple-english-branded-names

 

Transaction History Search

 

Most banking apps default to filtering transaction history by date. Giving the user the ability to search their account is one more way to facilitate finding that specific transaction they have in mind.

 

transaction-history-search

Appwide Search

 

Few banks offer app-wide search to locate features & information. It might just be what your clients needed to discover new or undiscovered features.

 

appwide-search-my-bank

Clear ‘Back’ Access

 

Avoid using a home icon or cancel in place of a back.

 

clear-back-access-button

Autofill/Type-Ahead Searching

 

We continue to be surprised at the number of banks not make use of this simple yet effective interaction. Your customers will be thrilled to have it implemented.

autofill-type-ahead-searching

Content

 

The content that users access in-app should be concise, easy to find, easy understand, and help them reach their goals—simple right? Here are a few ideas:

 

Key Information Front and Center

 

Some applications give users the choice to view account their account balances before login.

 

key-information-front-center

 

Helpful Services

 

Provide customers with additional services that could help them reach their financial goals.

 

helpful-services

 

Real-Time Alerts

 

Use real-time alerts to keep customers informed on important account updates such as direct deposits, personal information changes, and bill due dates.

 

real-time-alerts

 

Avoid Hiding Information

 

Some banks hide interest rates behind an extra tap or elaborate application process. Be nice to customers and let them know what they need to know.

 

avoid-hiding-information

 

Avoid Jargon-Heavy Content

 

Avoid words such as Debit, Payee, APR — instead use Withdrawal, Recipient, Interest Rate.

 

avoid-jargon-heavy-content

Guidance Part 2, coming soon

Privacy & Security Part 2, coming soon

Appearance Part 2, coming soon

 

Editor’s note: 

We know you’re thirsty for more. Part 2 will be coming very soon! While you wait, check out our latest thoughts on UX Strategy for Banks. 

Have any additional questions or want to discuss what Shockoe can do for you? Click here to connect with us. 

Adjustments to Your Bank’s UX Strategy

Adjustments to Your Bank’s UX Strategy

Among the sea of social media apps, news apps, and photo book-making apps I use – I have three kids! –  is my mobile banking app. I bank at a “traditional” or “retail” bank, meaning it has branches, versus an online-only bank. That being said, I never go to a branch. Anything I need to do I can do using my mobile banking app: check my transactions, transfer money between accounts, or deposit a check. Believe it or not, these things that users have come to expect out of their mobile banking experience, I have had to figure out rather the hard way with my current mobile banking app. The user experience of my bank’s app has never been truly intuitive, though it has gone through multiple iterations. Banking apps should not make it difficult for customers to complete basic tasks. By continuously putting user experience first and applying the following adjustments to your UX Strategy, your bank is guaranteed to drive revenue through customer loyalty. 

 

The first time I used Venmo, an app designed solely for people to be able to electronically send money, I immediately noticed the intuitiveness of the app. A few months after I started using Venmo, my bank came out with an identical feature. I could send money to friends or family no matter who they banked with. That’s as much as I know about it because the idea of using my bank’s clunky app for a task I found myself doing frequently seemed overwhelming, so I stuck with Venmo.

 

As more FinTech companies continue to disrupt, develop and innovate mobile banking applications, it will occur at the expense of lost market share for traditional banking institutions.The rising FinTech sector is making it easier making it easier for their customers to do more with their money.

 

At Shockoe we have advised our financial industry partners to consider two adjustments to their UX strategy as a result of this changing environment:

 

Implementing machine learning.

 

I, like many others, have predictable spending habits. I shop at the same places, I pay my mortgage, and I head to the grocery store at the same time. To keep an eye on my spending, I log into my banking app quite regularly.

 

The reason I point out these things is that this is all data that the banks can use to help make me a “stickier” client. I get random ads sometimes when I log into my account, but they don’t happen as I take an action, nor are they personalized to me.

 

Banks are leaving a great opportunity to interact with their customers on the table. They could ask questions about unusual spending to improve security and more importantly learn about shifting habits. e.g. “It looks like you made a purchase at Wegman’s last weekend, was that you?”, the app learns that this is now part of my purchase history and the algorithm changes. Similarly, new products could be touted as client data captures what looks like a night out: “Looks like you left the kids at home and recently went to the movies! Did you pay your babysitter with our easy system to send money electronically to people?”

 

There should always be a way to turn these kinds of alerts off, but banks know so much about their users, and using machine learning capabilities is one way they can use that data to try to engage more with their clients.

 

Making banking apps more social. 

 

A big part of Venmo’s popularity comes down to the fact that they’ve tapped into the special sauce of why social media is so popular/addictive. You can interact with people, keep up with their latest transactions and see why they’re sending or receiving money for. Obviously, security is n essential consideration in banking, but for people that are willing to share, this is another outlet for banks to engage their audience, encourage product use, and compete in an increasingly competitive FinTech industry.

 

Do people want to be able to brag about their savings account interest rate? What else are people comfortable with being able to show off in regards to their banking relationship? We work with our clients to run user group feedback sessions to find the answers to things like this. User feedback should be an essential consideration in designing an engaging user experience that extends beyond logging in and checking on account statements.

 

Banking apps should no longer think of themselves as a one dimension account statement viewing portal. FinTech will eventually edge them out of services such as peer to peer payments (venmo), machine learning (mint), and potentially edge them out of being a provider at all in lucrative services. I am a project manager at Shockoe and I’ve worked with two large banking clients as part of my tenure here, and these thoughts are coming from meetings with them and our approach helping them stay engaged with their user base and attract more users through their mobile app solutions. What’s cool is our clients know we work together to create mobile applications that people use, love, and remember, and that sometimes the problems are even solved by the project management team.

3 Tips to Start Using Motion in Design

3 Tips to Start Using Motion in Design

Motion connects the designers and developers who are working on a mobile application with its users. Scrolling, navigating through screens, and adding or editing content may all be inherent features of an app in 2017, but the app still needs to feel right. UX designers live for the challenge of making an app feel right to the user, and motion is one tool in their arsenal. As Shockoe tackles mastering this tool, here are three tips for how to start thinking about integrating motion into your designs.

Tip 1: Show the Relation

You’ve put in the work, made the sitemap, and even mapped out the flow. You know exactly how to get from Screen A to Screen Z. Do your users? It’s important to make sure your users will be able to navigate the app with the same fluidity you do. Probably the best option for ensuring this is one of the simplest: show your user where the screens are coming from.

Navigating from the leftmost tab to the one on the right? Show that by pushing your current content off-screen to the left, making room for the new content coming in from the right. Google Play Music is a fantastic example of how an entirely new page can originate from a single, much smaller element. It shows the growth of that element into a full page.

Tip 2: Don’t Lose the Users

This touches a bit on the last point, but it is key that you don’t confuse your users or lose them in a complicated motion. If you have too many elements moving in too many directions, or even one element moving too far, you may run into some problems.

An example of what to do and what not to do both come from different implementations of the same feature in different versions of the Android operating system. On devices that ran Android M, there was a hovering search bar at the top of the home screen. This was a great addition, bringing a Google search right to the forefront of the user’s most-frequented screen. As you might expect, the search automatically offered suggestions as the user typed.

On the newest Pixel 2, that search bar has been moved to the bottom of the home screen, just under the app drawer and just above the software buttons. A UX/hardware issue is solved here by allowing users to reach their search bar more easily, but a visual transition issue is created. When the user taps the new bottom-anchored search bar, it acts like before and is now on the top of the screen, populating your autofill search results. This is probably nit-picking and just requires some getting used to, but it makes the search bar feel like more of an “activation” and not a true, transforming element on the device’s screen. That takes away a bit of what made that simplicity in movement so special.

Tip 3: Have Some Fun. Find It, If You Have To

This point applies to everyone in design, but it holds special weight in designing motion as there is so much that can be done. This is more for your own sanity, but it’s very important in every project to have even a little fun, and not nearly enough people value taking a moment to do so. A solid check for this is looking inward and thinking about what you would want to see an app do.

Take 15 minutes, grab your notebook and a pencil, create some sketches, and just … go with it. Look at what’s been done in other apps, what hasn’t, and find what works for you. Don’t limit yourself to the mobile realm for inspiration; consider television shows, video games, etc., as well. The kind of work we’re most proud of is typically the work we enjoy making, so be sure to explore every corner of your creativity when designing motion.

So what are your thoughts?

Hopefully, these tips have helped you start thinking about the ways you can use motion in your designs. In this post, we touched on the basics of motion; we look forward to expanding on these ideas in a future post that dives deeper into the nitty-gritty details on how to make motion work in your apps. As you start integrating motion into your projects, reach out and let us know what you think, if you have any thoughts to add, or if these tips have helped you out in any way.

Editor’s Note: 

Want more tips on Design? Check out our most recent blogs:

10 Commandments of Designing for Accessibility Every Designer Needs to Know

How to Apply Minimalism to Complex Apps

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How to Create Moodboards that Help You Better Understand Your Client

How to Create Moodboards that Help You Better Understand Your Client

For new design projects, blank artboards can strike fear in many designers. Approaching a new task with a blank slate is never easy, especially under a deadline or without a clear objective. That blank rectangle can be the biggest block to any momentum in getting a project moving. But don’t despair! Using mood boards can help kick off any design project and remove the fear of directionless design.

What is a mood board?

A mood board is a collection of style—like color, texture, UI framework, or theme—that visually unifies a set of images. Part of what makes the tool so valuable is how malleable mood boards are to each project. Each board simply needs a cohesive connector that all the elements on the board stem from.

For example, this board shows off monochromatic color schemes:

And this one shows different examples of Google’s material design applied to different screens:

 

Having a theme to draw them together allows design teams and clients to react to different conceptual directions, allowing for different ideas to be explored early and with little time.

When should you use mood boards?

Mood boards should be implemented early. They are a fairly low-investment tool that you can use to get in step with your client/stakeholder/design lead early on. With clients at Shockoe, we use them early in our design process to get a sense of the client’s needs and tastes while also exploring some potential directions without burning too much time.

Potential times to bring mood boards into projects: Early design discussions, design concept pitching, stakeholder exercises.

How to make mood boards:

There are many ways to develop useful mood boards. When planning boards, a great way to start is to define your audience. Is the purpose of the mood board for you to discover tones and feels? Is it to guide a client or stakeholder in a certain direction? Defining your audience and purpose will help shape the direction of boards to create productive discussion.

Want to explore different color options? Group different items of the same color to get a feel for the application.

Want to look into different design systems? Show them together, or back to back.

It really helps to have a log of potential approaches and looks to help influence the direction of the project and discuss options before running with a certain design.

I tend to approach my mood boards in three steps: Think, Collect, and Organize.

1: Think

Starting out, I write down as much information as I can. I try to roll up all my knowledge on the project so far and start thinking of things I want to use for inspiration, like colors, products to be inspired by, people or places that should influence or impact the design, or just cool anecdotes I can recall from earlier meetings with a client.

2: Collect

After the brainstorming step, I create a project folder to store assets. I keep anything and everything I find interesting in that folder that could be used in the project. Pinterest and Dribbble are obvious choices when searching for inspiration, but I also find lots of really interesting ideas by looking at different mediums. Furniture, architecture, and game design blogs have all provided great ideas to consider for potential inspiration.

3: Organize

From here, I use my favorite tool for mood boards to collect and organize the different images designers and I have curated: Google Slides.

 

 

 

 

 

Google Slides acts as a fantastic repo to collect and organize thoughts. The ability to collaborate with other designers makes the tool even more awesome when working on larger design teams.

When laying out designs, I find it useful to pick a lead image and then build out elements around it. That way when discussing the project with a design director or client, you can orient the discussion around that image and define your intent with a style in that direction.

Presenting boards

The last step of using mood boards in design is getting a sense of which way to run when it comes time to start the actual design process. I’ve always enjoyed the candid and open discussion around mood boards. Planning out how you want the discussion to go will really help create a structured conversation that will benefit both you and the client. By knowing the discussion you want to have around the boards, you are able to ensure that the feedback you receive provides clear direction so you are not left with that dreaded blank artboard rectangle.

If you’re ever in a stalemate about which way a client thinks a project should go, or if you want to feel out some new or riskier design directions, mood boards are a fantastic tool to quickly define a style and explore different routes for the project. Don’t stare at blank art boards—go make mood boards!

Notes from Editor:

You can find more design blogs from our team on our blog page.

[INFOGRAPHIC] 10 Commandments of Designing for Accessibility Every Designer Needs to Know

How to Apply Minimalism to Complex Apps

Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality… Confused Yet?

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Sign up for the Shockoe newsletter and we'll keep you updated with the latest blogs, podcasts, and events focused on emerging mobile trends.